About Us

Marketing consultation with senior executives

Founded in 1976 and headquartered in Dallas, Texas, The Dallas Marketing Group is led by principals with extensive senior management experience in business and academics – experience which adds depth and insight to the firm’s work. They share a passion for helping clients meet their strategic objectives.

Our backgrounds speak volumes about our capabilities, but what stands out most is the breadth and loyalty of our clients: they represent a broad range of industries and business sectors, and the vast majority of our clients come to us again and again, and refer us to others. Many clients on our roster have worked with us for 5, 10, 20 or more years.

Executive Bios

William E. Silverman - President

Michael E. Egan – Senior Vice President

Cheryl R. Halpern – Vice President

  

THE FIVE: Dallas marketing maven offers tips

Published in The Dallas Morning News, June 20, 2012:

A local expert provides five recommendations on a topic useful to small business owners. This week, Dallas marketing maven Cheryl R. Halpern talked to staff writer, Sheryl Jean about five tips for conducting effective market research.

1. Develop clear objectives

Think through what you want to learn and how you will use the information. For example, do you want to better understand how and when consumers would use your product or service to help refine the design?

2. Identify the target

Obtaining input from people who aren’t your existing, potential or former customers can be misleading and result in poor decisions. Make sure you speak with decision-makers or key influencers.

3. Use appropriate methodology

There are many viable ways to conduct market research, including surveys, focus groups and online bulletin boards. Don’t choose a research tool simply because it’s trendy or familiar. Select the methodology that best suits your objectives and target audience.

4. Avoid selling

Be objective when asking for feedback. You will learn as much — if not more — from negative responses as positive ones.

5. Understand the implications

Research can help shape decisions, but it won’t eliminate the need for sound business judgment. An idea that gets rave reviews in research can fall flat if executed poorly, just as one that’s rejected may thrive due to factors beyond the scope of the research.